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February 14 2012 3 14 /02 /February /2012 16:00

12-17 - Use Control + F to find what you want in here

Magnet dissolution: The solution has turned the same color as the mischmetal solutions have. The color does not noticeably change when exposed to fluorescent light versus sunlight. Is this the result of iron?

Cadmium production: The filtered solution is green(?). Upon zinc reduction, a few magnetic particles appear to form, but they could just be junk on the zinc. Later, some very weakly magnetic particles form (cadmium), which dissolve slowly in the green solution. Some nickel was produced as well.  Further on, more cadmium appears to have precipitated; the zinc has become coated with a black nonmagnetic substance.

 

 

Nickel dissolution: Upon placement of the NiOOH cathode in HCl, a little fizzing was produced, along with a very lightly colored solution. It appears that no nickel was dissolved. The “cadmium” produced more green than the “nickel”.

12-18

Magnet dissolution: Overnight, some insoluble matter has formed in the magnet – acetic acid mixture. A large amount of iron filings are attracted to the magnet, probably as the result of preferential neodymium oxidation. The solution appears to have dissolved quite some iron.

12-19

Mischmetal reactions: The mischmetal solution turned very light yellow when ascorbic acid was added, showing that a highly colored complex of iron(III) was present. Upon addition of sodium bicarbonate, an extremely dark purple iron(II) ascorbate complex (seen with another iron exploration) was formed. It appears red upon transmitted light. It oxidizes to brown in air.

 

 

 

Threshold frequency experiment: A glow-(green)-in-the-dark object was placed in the dark until its glow diminished to a steady level. It was then exposed to equal quantities of red and white light. The red did not have any noticeable effect since just about all of its emitted photons were below green, which is the threshold frequency. The white did have a noticeable effect. From left to right: Beginning, Red, and White.

12-20

Magnet dissolution: Inclusion of air meant that the residual iron was oxidized rapidly. A small amount of the bright red iron(III) acetate complex was formed, but mostly iron(III) hydroxide was formed. If air is excluded, this might be a good way to extract neodymium from their magnets, but as long as air is present, the rusting process gets its way.

Tissue chlorate: The bleach-soaked tissue had dried onto the container and was peeled off in shreds and squeezed together. It seems quite heavy, as if there is a significant amount of chloride and chlorate present.

Cobalt chloride and zinc: Although some hydrogen is being produced, no cobalt is made at first. After a couple hours, however, microscopic cobalt pieces are made. The amount of cobalt gradually increases, as evidenced by a magnet sweep.

Magnetic metals: Iron, cobalt, and nickel are videotaped. The iron is an electromagnet core; the cobalt is produced by magnesium reduction; and the nickel is a 5 cent Canadian coin.

Copper(II) chloride production. A mixture of about 5:1 ratio of 3% hydrogen peroxide to 31.45% hydrochloric acid dissolves copper well, resulting in a green solution. The copper partially dissolves in the solution again, forming a black mixed oxidation state complex which is oxidized by the air during evaporation.

 

12-21

Nicad battery reactions: The “nickel” crystallized with white crystals after HCl was sprinkled on the electrode, while the “cadmium” began forming wet-looking crystals on the surface of the fluid after significant evaporation. Neither seemed deliquescent, which makes it a puzzle worthy to leave in the past. ;)

Metal determination for CO detector: The metal does not appear to dissolve in the basic solution produced when lithium reacts with water, but neither does the aluminium foil, so it could still be Al.

Mini fireplace: A 2B pencil when heated by its internal lead emits smoke at the ends as they get hot first. Unfortunately, the power supply burnt its fuse.

Alnico magnet extraction: An old dB meter contained an alnico magnet, as evidenced by its lack of fracture when struck.

Capacitor boom: Capacitors when run on relatively high AC voltage tend to vent their electrolyte somewhat dramatically, although not explosively.

Tissue chlorate: The tissue did not seem to burn any more rapidly than normal. There are several potential reasons: 1) the tissue was crumpled up; 2) there was not enough chlorate to provide the oxygen to ignite the inside; 3) the excess of sodium chloride could have a dampening effect on the combustion; 4) the tissue has fire-retardant chemicals in it.

Hydrogen ignition: Zinc was reacted with HCl and the hydrogen produced was ignited by a spark. However, the wood piece attached to the sparking mechanism became moist with the foaming and the spark no longer worked after a few seconds. A repeat experiment worked much better, with the zinc forming massive hydrogen bubbles which ignited wonderfully.

12-22

Magnetism experiment: Various materials were floated on an aluminium foil boat (shown to have practically no magnetism because of impurities) and placed close to a powerful magnet. Their response was documented and compared to recorded responses. Diamagnetic materials repel a magnet, while paramagnetic materials attract a magnet.

The two anomalies were because the carbon rod was probably tainted with iron impurities, and the molybdenum was encased in diamagnetic quartz glass.

Wheel weight dissolution: Wheel weights have begun dissolving in a 1:1 mixture of 5% acetic acid and 3% hydrogen peroxide. If any of the other elements have oxidized in this environment, the white oxides are invisible in the black forest of[redacted] puffy powder that accumulated.

 

Boron extraction: A neodymium magnet was dissolved in HCl for the sole purpose of obtaining boron powder.

Hydrogen ignition: Hydrogen was ignited [redacted].

Hydrogen peroxide concentration: Hydrogen peroxide is cooled in freezer in an attempt to concentrate it for no reason. Some crystals form and are removed. The residual liquid is frozen further.

Lead iodide: Lead acetate, acetic acid, and ascorbic acid are reacted with tincture of iodine. Lead iodide is precipitated. A small amount of lead iodide is dissolved in hot water and a crystallization attempt failed.

12-23

Lead iodide production: A measly, but still significant amount of lead(II) iodide was found on the filter paper. The crystallization experiment may be repeated with the yellow residue on the paper.

Magnet dissolution: A sizable amount of boron was formed by the magnet’s dissolution. The acid solution was washed away very carefully and replaced with water, which was mostly pipetted off. The rest of the water will evaporate, leaving boron powder in the container.

Lead halides: Lead bromide was precipitated by reaction of the lead acetate solution with a saturated aqueous solution of sodium bromide (produced by dissolving NaBr in hot water). Lead chloride was produced by reaction with hydrochloric acid. Lead bromide appears a tiny bit more off white than the chloride, but not much different.

 

[redacted]

Lead iodide production: The lead iodide appears to have turned yellow-brown over time.

[redacted]

Rare earth extractions: Cerium does not appear to oxidize in acetic acid solution spontaneously. Because of the tiny amount of iron in the previous solution (1% or so) it did not precipitate separately from the rest of the rare earth metals. A rerun is attempted with dilute acetic acid and quick removal of the ferrocerium to prevent aerial oxidation of the iron. Upon addition of hydrogen peroxide, the light pink solution turned yellow, just like cerium is supposed to. When sodium bicarbonate is added, however, the yellow does not lighten but instead partially precipitates as an orange precipitate. Neither is reduced by ascorbic acid. Reacidification with hydrochloric acid then activates the ascorbic acid, which reduces it to a relatively colorless solution.

 

 

 

Rare earth extractions: Ferrocerium is added to 2% acetic acid with zinc to suppress the oxidation of iron. Hopefully, the iron(II) will become reduced by the zinc back to elemental iron. The solution appears brownish and changes color slightly between fluorescent and incandescent light. Samarium(II) is a possibility, as well as a combination of several rare earth salts.

Cd

Bottom                                               Top

Material

Experimental Magnetism

Recorded Magnetism

Aluminium

?

Attracted

Zinc

Repelled

Repelled

Bismuth

Repelled

Repelled

Battery junk

Attracted

?

Lead titanate zirconate

Attracted

?

Iron pyrite

Attracted

?

Silver

Repelled

Repelled

Lead/tin(?) foil

Attracted

Lead repelled, tin attracted

Tin/Antimony blob

Attracted

Antimony repelled, tin attracted

Hafnium

Attracted

Attracted

Magnesium

Attracted

Attracted

Gold

Repelled

Repelled

Copper

Repelled

Repelled

Lithium

Attracted

Attracted

Carbon

Attracted

Repelled

Molybdenum

Repelled

Attracted

Sodium chloride

Repelled

Repelled

Lead chloride

Original      After hydrogen peroxide

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Published by LanthanumK - in Experiments
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